When we hear the word “Milan,” we usually think of fashion and, perhaps, Milan Cathedral. However, the city has a lot more to offer, even though the sights there are not as well-known as those in Rome. We chose 8 of them and would like to share them with you now:

  1. The Navigli District
  2. Corso di Porta Ticinese Street
  3. The Brera District
  4. Milan Cathedral
  5. The Old Tram
  6. The Mercato Metropolitano
  7. The Cimitero Monumentale
  8. The Medieval Quarter

1. The Navigli District

It is fairly unknown that Milan used to be crossed by canals that connected the city to large bodies of water, such as Lake Maggiore. Some of its duct systems were even designed by Leonardo da Vinci. Today, most of the canals are built over and, therefore, no longer accessible. Three of the canals have survived to date and are now a major attraction for tourists. There are many artisans, gift shops, bars, and restaurants along the canals. You can stroll along the Navigli district during the day and in the evening.

A visit to the Navigli district would be incomplete without a tour of the local flea market, which is usually open on the last Sunday of the month. Flowers and plants are sold there in spring.

2. Corso di Porta Ticinese Street

This street can be easily reached on foot from the cathedral. You can also take it to get to the Navigli district. It is worth visiting for three reasons:

  • Porta Ticinese, an old city gate of medieval Milan
  • Colonne di San Lorenzo, a row of 16 Corinthian columns, which have survived since the Roman era.
  • Basilica of San Lorenzo. The remains of three wise men were in the basilica until they were stolen by King Barbarossa and brought to Cologne.

This street is also full of small restaurants, bars, and cafes. All of these make you want to come back here again and again.

3. The Brera District

The Brera district is an old neighborhood with many small streets. It is now mainly a pedestrian zone. The district is crisscrossed by restaurants of all price ranges, bars, ice cream parlors, small shops, studios, and markets. Strolling through this district and discovering the houses or old palaces in the narrow streets will provide you with an unforgettable experience.

4. Milan Cathedral

The Milan Cathedral is worth a visit not only because of its splendid interior but also because of its roof. You can climb to the roof and enjoy the decoration and fine construction design of the cathedral from there. While there, you can also enjoy a wonderful view of Milan. After descending from the roof, you can see the cathedral’s interior from a small area. If you find it inadequate, you can always buy a €2 ticket and enjoy the cathedral in its entirety.

When buying a ticket, you can choose between climbing a 250-step staircase (€2) or taking an elevator for €8 (the average price of multiple-choice questions assignment on https://custom-essays-writings.com/). It’s a good idea to ascend the roof is always on weekdays because there’ll be far fewer people in the cathedral

Since you’re here, you can also visit another landmark of Milan — the Vittorio Emanuele II. It is a gallery of luxury shops, expensive cafes, and restaurants.

5. Ride the Old Tram

Riding a tram is a special experience in Milan. What makes it special is the feeling that you get when you travel in a streetcar built in the 1920s. Since the Milanese are really fond of it, it is still in service. Anyone who has ever been to San Francisco and taken the F-Line Historic Streetcar there knows what car we’re talking about.

6. Mercato Metropolitano

The Mercato Metropolitano is an urban utility garden created on an old industrial site as part of Expo 2015. When you get there, you’ll see plenty of fruit and vegetable trees grown in boxes and sacks. There is a farmers’ and a street food market as well. During the daytime, you can sample various Italian delicacies here. You can also enjoy an open-air cinema and listen to live soothing music in the evening.

The Mercato is located on the Porta Genova, near the Navigli canals.

7. The Cimitero Monumentale

The Milan Central Cemetery is not only a cemetery but also a huge open-air museum. At the entrance, you will be greeted by the monumental temple of honor. Originally planned as a Catholic church, it is now used as a place of remembrance of outstanding personalities from Milan. The grounds of the cemetery go all the way beyond the temple of honor. The most striking feature of this cemetery is the splendid mausoleums of rich and famous Milanese families. You can also find smaller tombs between them, which are no less impressive.

8. The Medieval Quarter

The medieval quarter (San Vittorio/Cinque Vie) is similar to the Brera district, but not as crowded. This area suffered very little damage during World War II, owing to which you can see what Milan looked like 200 years ago. Many streets here still have cobblestones and are not paved. There are many small, winding streets with old houses. It’s worth looking into every open gate, because the true treasures, such as artistically designed gardens, are often hidden in the courtyard.